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Measuring Resilience: Use of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale for People With Spinal Cord Injuries

In Disability Specific, Featured, Findings, News, Psychosocial Adjustment, Quality of Life, Research Findings, Spinal Cord Injury, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor Skills and Competency by SVRI0 Comments

Resilience, in its simplest terms, results in people “bouncing back” from adversity and getting on with their lives. To infer resilience, two major steps must occur: (a) exposure to significant adversity (e.g., car accident), and (b) a positive developmental outcome afterwards (e.g., substantial psychosocial adjustment). The construct of resilience has recently been explored among individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). …

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Using the Moorong Self-Efficacy Scale to Assist People with Spinal Cord Injuries

In Disability Specific, Evidence-Based Practice, Featured, Findings, Health Promotion, News, Psychosocial Adjustment, Quality of Life, Research Findings, Spinal Cord Injury by SVRI0 Comments

Individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) may experience functional limitations and societal barriers that affect their belief in their ability to perform daily activities and achieve goals.  This belief, known as self-efficacy, helps individuals select goals and persist in attaining them.  People with high self-efficacy tend to persevere in challenging circumstances, and people with low levels of self-efficacy are less …

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Emphasizing the Positive: The Role of Attachment Style, Social Support, and Coping on Happiness in Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

In Disability Specific, Evidence-Based Practice, Featured, Findings, Health Promotion, News, Psychosocial Adjustment, Quality of Life, Research Findings, Spinal Cord Injury by SVRI0 Comments

Approximately 19%, or 56.7 million, of people in the United States have a disability that affects how they function in their daily activities.  These individuals’ attachment styles, approaches to coping, and levels and types of social support have been identified as indicators of how well they will positively adjust to disability.  The purpose of this research was to examine how …

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Measuring Adaptation to Disability: Validation of the Brief Adaptation to Disability Scale – Revised

In Disability Specific, Evidence-Based Practice, Featured, Findings, Health Promotion, News, Psychosocial Adjustment, Quality of Life, Research Findings, Spinal Cord Injury by SVRI0 Comments

Research suggests that individuals with higher levels of disability acceptance experience higher levels of functional independence and life satisfaction.  Disability acceptance is an indication of readiness to pursue appropriate social and career goals, gain new skills, integrate disability into self-identity, and restore positive self-worth.  This study was conducted to validate the use of the B-ADS-R to measure disability acceptance in …

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Measuring Hope: Use of the Trait Hope Scale for People with Disabilities

In Disability Specific, Featured, Findings, News, Psychosocial Adjustment, Quality of Life, Research Findings, Spinal Cord Injury, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor Skills and Competency by SVRI0 Comments

Snyder’s Hope Theory states that hope results from a combination of believing there is a way to achieve personal goals and being motivated to take action to pursue those goals.   Hope contributes to positive psychosocial adjustment outcomes, including academic achievement and physical and mental health, in people with chronic illness and disability.  It also results in greater life satisfaction, self-esteem, and …

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Promoting Physical Activity and Exercise in People with Spinal Cord Injuries using Pender’s Health Promotion Model

In Disability Specific, Findings, Health Promotion, News, Research Findings, Spinal Cord Injury by SVRI0 Comments

Secondary conditions of a disability, such as pain, depression, pressure sores, and respiratory illness, often increase the functional disability of an individual by limiting their ability to engage in key life activities, such as employment and leisure pursuits. People with spinal cord injuries (SCI) are particularly vulnerable to secondary conditions due to physical limitations and a sedentary lifestyle.  Increased exercise …

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Identifying Vocational Rehabilitation Service Patterns and Employment Outcomes for Hispanics with Spinal Cord Injury

In Disability Specific, Featured, Findings, News, Research Findings, RSA-911 Data, Spinal Cord Injury by SVRI0 Comments

Demographics in the United States are changing rapidly; it’s estimated that minorities may constitute up to 45% of the country’s total population by 2050.  Research suggests that ethnic minorities may potentially be more vulnerable to acquiring spinal cord injuries (SCI) than European-Americans. In addition, research shows that employment has a significant impact on improving the quality of life of individuals …

Predictive Ability of Pender’s Health Promotion Model for Physical Activity and Exercise in People With Spinal Cord Injuries: A Hierarchical Regression Analysis

In Health Promotion, News, Research Findings, Spinal Cord Injury by SVRI0 Comments

Abstract The main objective of this study was to validate Pender’s Health Promotion Model (HPM) as a motivational model for exercise/physical activity self-management for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Quantitative descriptive research design using hierarchical regression analysis (HRA) was used. A total of 126 individuals with SCI were recruited through the National Spinal Cord Injury Association, other SCI support …