Using Motivational Interviewing (MI) to Improve Employment Outcomes for Consumers Receiving Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Services

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The evidence-based IPS program underscores competitive work, rapid job search, integration of rehabilitation and mental health services, attention to consumer preferences, consumer choice, and time-unlimited support. IPS has been widely studied to show positive outcomes among people with psychiatric disabilities who receive services from the state/federal vocational rehabilitation system. Despite this, these consumers often demonstrate shorter job retention rates and ambivalence about finding a job after they start an IPS program due to their concern about the impact of employment on government benefits.

Results

Integrating both the practice of Motivational Interviewing and an understanding of the stages of change (transtheoretical model) with an IPS model of service delivery is likely to increase consumers’ engagement in work-related activities, and to further increase number of obtained jobs, hours worked per week, hourly wage, and monthly job income.  The six stages of change are pre-contemplation, contemplation, determination, action, maintenance, and relapse. This framework describes the process of an individual moving from not even considering working (i.e., pre-contemplation) to being highly engaged in work related activities. It explains why some people may be more successful in obtaining employment than others.

Interventions

Provide IPS services for consumers in these stages of change:

  • Determination
  • Action
  • Maintenance

Provide MI services for consumers in these stages of change:

  • Precontemplation
  • Contemplation
  • Relapse

Bottom Line


The IPS program integrated with MI is likely to increase consumers’ engagement in work-related activities, and to further increase number of obtained jobs, hours worked per week, hourly wage, and monthly job income.

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Source: Larson, J. E., Barr, L. K., Kuwabara, S. A., Boyle, M. G., & Glenn, T. L. (2007). Process and outcome analysis of a supported employment program for people with psychiatric disabilities. American Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, 10(4), 339-353. doi: 10.1080/15487760701680604


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